jack vance might be best author ever

Literary influences

When asked about literary influences, Vance most often cited Jeffery Farnol, a writer of adventure books, whose style of “high” language he mentions (the Farnol title Guyfford of Weare being a typical instance); P. G. Wodehouse, an influence apparent in Vance’s taste for overbearing aunts; and L. Frank Baum, whose fantasy elements were directly borrowed by Vance (see ‘The Emerald City of Oz’).[18] In the introduction to Dowling and Strahan’s The Jack Vance Treasury, Vance mentions that his childhood reading including Edgar Rice Burroughs, Jules Verne, Robert W. Chambers, science fiction published by Edward Stratemeyer, the magazines Weird Tales and Amazing Stories, and Lord Dunsany.[10] According to pulp editor Sam Merwin, Vance’s earliest magazine submissions in the 1940s were heavily influenced by the style of James Branch Cabell.[19] Fantasy historian Lin Carter notes several probable lasting influences of Cabell on Vance’s work, and suggests that the early “pseudo-Cabell” experiments bore fruit in The Dying Earth (1950).[20] SF critic Don Herron [21] cites Clark Ashton Smith as an influence on Vance’s style and characters’ names.

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